surf board

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Questions and Answers

What size surf board?

Im wanting to start surfing in north bay area searching for a board but dont know what size any suggestions for a begginer?

Posted by jack
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If you are just starting, getting your own board is way down at the bottom of your "to-do" list.

Before you even think about surfing, there are some things you should understand. Surfing is an ocean sport, that should only be practiced by persons who are already competent ocean swimmers. Swimming in a pool is neat, but it's not ocean swimming, with undertows, rip tides and sometimes BIG waves. I have seen lots of great pool swimmers get rescued. So, my first tip on how to surf is to be at home in the ocean. It doesn't matter how fast you can swim in a pool or run on a track, it matters how well can you swim in a rip current in overhead waves.There are way too many dangerous people in the water now. They are a danger to themselves and other surfers, don't join their ranks.

Lessons are the best way to start. Lessons can come from a professional instructor, or surfing family members or experienced surfing friends. You have to learn surf etiquette (so the experienced surfers in the line up don't want to drown you), how to paddle and take off on a wave, and how to ride a wave. The last thing experienced surfers want is for inexperienced people to just grab a board, rush into the surf and get in our way. Lessons shorten the learning curve significantly. And they help keep ignorant, un-prepared kooks out of the water and out of the way of more experienced surfers.

Beginners should take advantage of renting boards and wetsuits while taking lessons. If it turns out you don't like surfing, you haven't wasted a whole lot of money on gear that you are not going to use. When you are ready to buy, don't waste your time on line, go to a good local surf shop to discuss your size (weight is import, height isn't), skill level and local wave conditions. After almost 43 years of surfing, I still get my surfboard buying advice from good local shops in the places where i surf.

Almost ALL instructors will start you off on a longboard. It is just too difficult for most people to learn how to surf on a short board. Most get quickly discouraged, and just quit. Now, over the years, I have seen some young surfers start out on short boards and master them in time. But it's just common sense to learn on a long board.

When you are ready to buy please avoid popouts in general, and especially popouts made in third world country sweat shops by People who have probably never seen the ocean.

Here is a list of sweat shop popouts:
Http://bp3.blogger.com/_hPACOtZKKko/RkST…

And here is why to avoid ALL popouts:Http://www.mckevlins.com/nopopstory.htm

Anybody who would give you SPECIFIC advice as to what size or type board to buy on-line is foolish. Anybody who would take that advice is more foolish

And, I know there are lots of nice kids who want to share information with you on line. But don't take the advice from youngsters, who may know even less than you do about surfing, a surfboard is a big investment. I hope you are mature enough to read through the BS that lots of people throw at you on line. You don't know anywhere near enough about surfboards to by one from an on-line web site without getting disappointed. Don't waste your time on line, go straight to the source, a good local shop.

What is the best kind of surf board?

I live in mn and know nothing of surf boards and the first snowboard i bought was crap until i started snowboarding and learned more about them. Now I'm really good and know almost everything there is to know about snowboards. But still the first one or two i bought were pieces of crap. So whats the best kind of surf board?

Posted by Kevin
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Can I assume form the way your question is worded, that you want to leave Minnesota and surf? Or, are you just curious about surfboards?

Either way, there is no "Best Kind" of surfboard. There are diffrent designs of surfboards, for different styles of surfing, by people of different skill levels, in different types of waves. The bottom line, however, is that if you were skilled enough, you could surf on a piece of plywood. Granted, that is an extreme statement, and I fully acknowldege that design and construction quality do really make a difference.

All anyone really needs is a surfboard that floats them well enought at their present skill level, to paddle and catch wave. There are dozens of high quality big name surfboard manufacturers. They produce a variety of boards in many designs and sizes. The real test of any manufacturer, is the ability for them to custom make a surfboard to a given surfer's specifications. I have been surfing since 1966, and two of my most favorite boards over the years have been ones made for me, to my personal specifications.

In addition to big name manufacturers, there are companies that produce machine made, mass produced junk, that we call popouts. Many of them are made in sweatshops in third world countries by underpaid laborers who may never have ever seen the ocean let alone ever surfed in it.

There are also lots of small local 'shapers" . Small companies operated by real craftsmen who put real care and effort into every board they build. Quality still counts for them.

So, you will probably get a lot of answers, praising the big guys, like Channel Islands, or Lost, or Stewart, or Harbour….and they are good, But the real quality comes from the local shapers who are able to build you a custom board that is "just right."

These are some 'sweat shop" made boards:http://bp3.blogger.com/_hPACOtZKKko/RkSTwhvv9kI/AAAAAAAAAfg/QMqBFAtXzQ4/s1600-h/chinaboards.jpg

Here is the problem with popouts: Http://www.mckevlins.com/nopopstory.htm

These are some different types of surfboard designs:http://360guide.info/surfing/surfboard-types.html?Itemid=51

If you are thinking about surfing, there are some things you should understand. Surfing is an ocean sport, that should only be practiced by persons who are already competent ocean swimmers. Swimming in a pool is neat, but it's not ocean swimming, with undertows, rip tides and sometimes BIG waves. I have seen lots of great pool swimmers get rescued. So, my first tip on how to surf is to be at home in the ocean.There are way too many dangerous people in the water now. They are a danger to themselves and other surfers, don't join their ranks.You may already have the ocean skills, we don't know too much about you.

Lessons are the best way to start. Lessons can come from a professional instructor, or surfing family members or experienced surfing friends. You have to learn surf etiquette (so the experienced surfers in the line up don't want to drown you), how to paddle and take off on a wave, and how to ride a wave. The last thing experienced surfers want is for inexperienced people to just grab a board, rush into the surf and get in our way. Lessons shorten the learning curve significantly. And they help keep ignorant, un-prepared kooks out of the water and out of the way of more experienced surfers.

Almost ALL instructors will start you off on a longboard. It is just too difficult for most people to learn how to surf on a short board. Most get quickly discouraged, and just quit. Now, over the years, I have seen some young surfers start out on short boards and master them in time. There are no RULES on what kind of board you learn on, but it's just common sense to learn on a long board.

Beginners should take advantage of renting boards and wetsuits while taking lessons. If it turns out you don't like surfing, you haven't wasted a whole lot of money on gear that you are not going to use. When you are ready to buy, don't waste your time on line, go to a good local surf shop to discuss your size (weight is import, height isn't), skill level and local wave conditions. After 44 years of surfing, I still get my surfboard buying advice from good local shops in the places where i surf.

Surf Board?

What is the sizes surf boards.

Posted by wildcatsrule12
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Hey wildcat. Check out "add/view comments" at this question.
Http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;…

And an answer to your surfboard question:

Surfing can be done on various pieces of equipment, including surfboards, bodyboards, wave skis, kneeboards and surf mat. Surfboards were originally made of solid wood and were generally quite large and heavy (often up to 12 feet long and 100 pounds). Lighter balsa wood surfboards (first made in the late 1940s and early 1950s) were a significant improvement, not only in portability, but also in increasing maneuverability on the wave.

Most modern surfboards are made of polyurethane foam (with one or more wooden strips or "stringers"), fiberglass cloth, and polyester resin. An emerging surf technology is an epoxy surfboard, which are stronger and lighter than traditional fiberglass.

Equipment used in surfing includes a leash (to keep a surfer's board from washing to shore after a "wipeout", and to prevent it from hitting other surfers), surf wax and/or traction pads (to keep a surfers feet from slipping off the deck of the board), and "fins" (also known as "skegs") which can either be permanently attached ("glassed-on") or interchangeable. In warmer climates swimsuits, surf trunks or boardshorts are worn, and occasionally rash guards; in cold water surfers can opt to wear wetsuits, boots, hoods, and gloves to protect them against lower water temperatures

There are many different surfboard sizes, shapes, and designs in use today. Modern longboards, generally 9 to 10 feet in length, are remeniscent of the earliest surfboards, but now benefit from all the modern innovations of surfboard shaping and fin design.

The modern shortboard began its life in the late 1960s evolving up to today's common "thruster" style shortboard, a three fin design, usually around 6 feet in length.

Midsize boards, often called funboards are of a size somewhere in between a shortboard and longboard, with various shapes.

There are also various niche styles, such as the "Egg", a longboard-style short board, the "Fish", a short and wide board with a split tail and four fins, and the "Gun", a long and pointed board specifically designed for big waves.

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How to paint your surfboard 3

Ice Creek, Eisbach, Surfer - Free image - 333233